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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
of russia? and china and the position of the other members of the security council. >> you know, i've talked to all of them. and i was pleasantly surprised that in spite of their, you know, what kofi annan called fingerpointing, they actually have all of them a reasonably responsible attitude. and all they need is really get together and try to find you know, stop pointing their fingers at the other guy. and really work out work out whatever disagreements they have and the process. >> rose: let's take russia, i have interviewed all the foreign ministers here at this table there a all kinds of issues that divide them. i don't think the russians, you correct me, are committed to assad. >> no, not at all. >> they're not offering-- they are not committed to him they are basically saying we think there has to be some kind of negotiation to solve this thing rather than -- >> what they are saying is that it has to be syrian process, syrian lead process which everybody agrees to. we are against military intervention from outside. and whatever the syrians agree to is welcome to us except perhaps if y
edge -- >> questions to editor she mentioned the cold war. the request and asking what role does russia play in the world going forward. >> it is -- in a challenge of the finding its identity under totally different circumstances. russia has been an imperial power and it has had domestic support by its efforts in asia, the middle east and europe, depending on where it was, now russia has the problem of a declining population. declining russian population and muslim population that is forward of the muslim world. 3,000 miles from china which is based tricky dick nightmare in the sense that there are thirty million russians are on one side and 1 billion chinese on the other end the middle east which is an ideological nightmare and in europe, a historically difficult one for them so how -- and yet the image russia has of its leadership is that they have to be considered as a principal country in order to be taken seriously so fundamentally russia has to look for a pattern of cooperation but found methods of doing it but russia is not strategic to the west, bringing pressure on its neighbor
now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the russians or not? cold war they want or what is -- what consequences of that? from what i understand the foreign minister of russia was meeting with the gulf ministers, the gcc ministers, i, from what my information is he did not give in. they are standing exactly where they were. this is not -- the strategy is needed. it is not a strategy, and the u.s., no matter how much we try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the chan
that more caution is still advise. >> in russia, speculation is rife about the health of vladimir putin. this after the russian president canceled his traditional end of the year call-in show. >> he was also seen living in public. the kremlin says he's fine, but not everyone is convinced. >> in these images from state television, putin seems to be in discomfort. >> i read something on the internet, but i do not think he is seriously ill. everyone has the odd a campaign. >> by september, putin had a noticeable limp. the kremlin said he had pulled a muscle doing judo. >> that is something putin has painstakingly avoided in his 30 years as russia's most powerful politician. he has always been keen to project an image of himself as a virile and vulnerable leader. >> putin will do anything to say in power. anyone who has power clings to it. >> another source of pain might be the latest opinion polls. they suggest that only 15% of russians approve of the way he is running the country. >> well, some sports news now. in formula one racing, sebastian fettle will be looking to take another step t
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
on the least. the "a-team" coming back. the president told russia he would be very flexible aer the election. [inaudible] lou: well, we'r there. now the president has the flexibility and then the travel destination. we will have those for you next. that petraeus sex scandal worsens by the day. did o top spy but classified information and risk? is it just a coincidence that the white house waited until after the election? admiral james lyons joins us next. from 17 billion chips worldwide to a world of super-connected intelligence. the potential of freescale unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to investing with knowledge. the potential of td ameritrade unlocked. nyse eonext. unlocking the world's potential. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner movi forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. ♪ lou: general petraeus agreei
by china, russia and iran that would give the united nations control over the internet. we'll see what this week's u.n. vote could mean for your usage of the net here in america. >>> and a victim of superstorm sandy who got a personal promise from the president, now speaking out and calling the president's trip to new jersey, a big waste of time. >>> as we await the white house press briefing the senate bracing itself for possible confirmation hearings on u.s. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. the buzz on this is growing but could the benghazi debacle sink her chances and should it? we'll have a fair and balanced debate on that next. >> i think if he does, it could be, that kind of arrogance which is what i think it would be could be his undoing, because if she is put under oath and forced to go through and answer all these questions about benghazi i think it will put the administration in a really bad position ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting u
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
in russia that are bundled up for this next report. >> winter came early to moscow and brought an unusual amount of snow with it. the city dispatched within 10,000 snowplows, but it was not enough. rush-hour traffic backed up for miles and moved at a snail's pace. 50 centimeters of fresh snow are expected by friday. some are pleased. others less so. >> it makes you feel happy. it reminds you of the new year and holidays. >> horrible. i think it is horrible. dirt and pedals everywhere. i do not like it. >> in central europe, things look similar. a cold front is moving from the south and east across germany. in bavaria, slick roads caused morning accidents. meteorologists say temperatures will remain cold and snow will blanket germany by the weekend -- perfect weather to visit the christmas markets. >> speaking of christmas, there is less than a month to go now -- can you believe it? before the holiday. the season would not be complete without the christmas tree at rockefeller center. the mayor himself hit the switch at the ceremony, which drew thousands of spectators. >> it is a tradition
. the "a-team" coming back. the president told russia he would be very flexible after the election. [inaudible] lou: well, we're there. now the president has the flexibility and then the travel destination. we will have those for you next. that petraeus sex scandal worsens by the day. did our top spy but classified information and risk? is it just a coincidence that the white house waited until after the election? admiral james lyons joins us next. ♪ lou: general petraeus agreeing to testify on the benghazi attack, and he will do so in front of the house intelligence committee. he will be doing so behind closed doors as we now understand how that system will go. the question is, in part, as his credibility been compromised following the scandal that led to his resignation? by next guest says the scandal is a political cover and deception. joining us now, admiral james lyons, a retired commander of the u.s. pacific fleet. good to have you back with us. >> nice to be here. loo: the first question. that is, has his credibility been compromised to the point that he can be of very lit
in the u.n., quite frankly. they did a good job on libya, but china and russia are walking all over us. i think she is more political operative than anything else, when it comes to benghazi. >> one of the questions here is really who in different parts of our government knew what about what happened? knew the faces about what happened in benghazi on 9/11 and did they share it with everybody else? >> obviously, it's very troubling that ambassador rice' rendition turned out to be incorrect. and we need to get to the bottom of that. >> you want to get to the bottom of benghazi, have you to get obam a. obama is the bottom of benghazi. obama is the bottom of the coverup. that's why i said that this dwarfs wortgate. this is a coverup that dwarfs watergate. there are four people dead in this. >> greta: just in, tampa socialite, jill kelley, at the center of the scandal, had her special friends of macdill i.d. revoked. it gave her easy access to part of the military base. but paula broadwell, a lieutenant colonel in the army reserves got her security clearance suspended. and the fbi agent who hel
to let countries control the internet contact in their own borders. russia is backing that. some arab countries are pushing for identification of all internet users. some developing nations are asking to be have individual websites pay to reach users across internal borders. changes to the open internet policy could three new sensorship and give new ammunition to countries that try to silence critics in iran or china. the united states government opposes all the changes. as do tech giants like google, facebook, and microsoft. officials with the u.n. group say this has nothing to do with sensorship but they want to update the country treaty which has stayed the same since 1988 long before the internet became such a household term. long before we used it. and now the counterterrorism and computer crime analyst who is live with us this afternoon. you start reading this stuff and it is this weird soup. what, exactly, are they doing? >>guest: well, this is atlas shrugged. they are trying to do it under "we want to tax" and it is certain things about revenue and the sender pays but it boils
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be n
: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc news white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the republican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. suddenly being blamed for everything. the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone...but her likes 50% more cash. but i'm upping my game. do you want a candy cane? yes! do you want the puppy? yes! do you want a tricycle? yes! do you want 50 percent more sh? no! ♪ festive. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. what's in your wallet? ♪ lou:
job in libya but since then china and russia is walking all over us. i am not sure she is the strongest advocate. i think she is more political operative more than anything else when it comes to benghazi. i make a prediction. i think there will be a few democrats reluctant to vote for somebody involved what i think is a national security debacle. again, i've been on the other side of this when a republican administration is telling you everything is fine when it's not. >> [inaudible]. >> not yet, no. >> [inaudible]. >> i don't know. again, that's all, you see all, as he said earlier, all these things are flying around. somebody was doing this, somebody was doing that and for example, there's this, the latest is interesting, is this person who was associated with general petraeus said, at some gathering there was two or three libyans being held in the safe house. now the cia has said that's just patently false. all these things are flying around and we don't know. that's why we need an investigation. last one. yeah? >> [inaudible] . >> well, first of all, i think that is
, others is an autocratic regime. i talk a little bit about russia and china as autocratic regimes in the book, and i don't want see any problem with the -- i don't see any problem with the united states pushing those countries if they can, not by force. we could do it or not do it, that's a policy decision. and then, of course, there's radical islam which also is a type of -- would like to establish sharia as the constitutional structure in some countries. so there are different types of political systems, and i'm saying the philadelphia sovereignty is my preferred system. and also i think it's the best system. >> thank you for your presentation. i thought it was excellent. we see this stuff happening all the time, but you've captured it in very vivid, contrasting subjects, sovereignty or submission. and in the u.n. now there are other things being negotiated that would further weaken our sovereignty or cause us to be sub missive. so i'm wondering what your actions are. when i look at the country, some huge percentage wouldn't even know what you're talking about. then you get into
be effective adversely. the dependence of europe and russia and is that necessary? secondly, ongoing arrangements generated over the last two or three decades, largely by an american strategy designed to diminish your independence in russian energy. i play the general rule in georgia and providing access in the near future, is something that i'm sure some russians would like to undercut. so even without a massive outbreak of violence in the region and escalating clinton's and explosions, that would have consequences. very adverse to europe and to the united states. these partners in the negotiating process are motivated the same way as we are, on the part of some individuals, i'm not saying this is the official russian point of view, but some individuals in russia were strategists and might take themselves that we are really sure [inaudible] two that's interesting but let me play devil's advocate for a second. containment, in essence, it's on the brink of war. when the russians were those who may have different interest still be able to achieve some of those objectives when it comes
israel and the moss. no doubt about it. lou: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly working hard to prove the point. that is next. it up tomorrow, abc nws white house correspondent with his new book. we will be talking about that. former federal prosecutor and former u.s. ambassador to the united nations among our guests. coming right up, the "a-team" on the reublican rebellion against what. who is this guy? grover norquist -- grover norquist. we use this board to compare car insurance rates side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i pluggein snapshot, and 30 days later, with snapshot, i knew what i could s
nations. security council members france, china and russia is the idea that by pursuing this vote they will strengthen the hands of the nod democrat palestinian president mahmoud abbas against the more militant hamas which saw its popularity rise in the wake of that recent conflict in gaza. the palestinian officials for their parts mean they are not looking for a fight here. they are simply trying to advance the cause of peace. listen. we are here to reinstate the two state solution and this we will do tomorrow afternoon. >> and that vote will take place around 3:00 p.m. eastern tomorrow afternoon on what the u.n. named several years ago international palestinian solidarity day. shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations death comes all too frequently now in syria. today it was twin bombings in the capital city of damascus. people ran after the first explosion and that's when the killers detonated a second bomb. nearly 50 people died. there is no word on who is behind the attack. it is but the latest in the bloody battle between syria's government and its rebels. rebel
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
to criticize that just because want to see a wider solution. >> in light of the blocking that russia and china has taken against syria have that actually contribute any money to the humanitarian crisis that now exist in syria? >> i think occupation from russia and china have been very small. i will have to write to the honorable lady with details about the. they are not so large that have been committed in my mind, let us put it that way. we will encourage, i have encouraged before russia to make a contribution to those u.n. funds, but the biggest contribution, the biggest occupation comes from the states emphatically from the european union, third from the united kingdom. and, of course, we are also contributing the european union money. so the backing for these things is very heavily western as things stand. >> i know the foreign secretary said he didn't want to debate about the portion it or proportion. but while he is right to condemn militant rocket attacks would not also condemn the loss of innocent lives, particularly children? and with respect to both the u.n., is he out to be convince
, specimens of his remains are going to be sent to three labs, separate investigations in russia, switzerland and france where they will be investigating looking for traces of polonium or any other kinds of poison. to answer that question, how did arafat die? because there was never any public report of his medical report. his wife kept it secret. no one knows what really led to his death although they know he had a stroke. that's the issue, how did he die? the suspicion is, he was poisoned. the fingers pointed at israel. now maybe we'll find out. the scientists it will take them about three months before they have their results. israel's convinced they'll find natural causes. sorry. >> i was just saying, you and i remember, you better than anyone, from being there, and i remember covering the funeral, that there had been a lot of talk about arafat's being ill, his weakness, about his leadership, but it really is fascinating that in the intervening years and intervening eight years, the palestinians have divided between hamas and fatah more critically and really is a vacuum of leadership. >>
into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr. clash believes this lawsuit has no merit. a fast-moving storm is going across the mid-atlantic today. heavy rain, sleet and snow is hitting several stalts from west virginia to massachusetts. hundreds of car accidents have been reported throughout the region. many schools have closed. the powerball jackpot just got sweeter. the prize for tomorrow's drawing -- it's tomorrow? we have to get a ticket. it's now a reco
it to russia which i think is a cool idea. i got shutdown by the embassy. it is a great idea. in needs to be bigger. the bbg has an impossible to is as to do twoeared things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile. in my view they have done an excellent job of reconciling its. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. it is a real journalistic institution. in need to abide by normal journalistic principles. talking to both of those things? it is hard for those who do not understand what the law actually says. i have, around to the view that the bbg needs to be brought into the broader foreign-policy making apparatus of the united states government. other was i just do not think it is going to survive. i think that attention needs to be resolved one way or another pie. the way it works now is that we used to sit down a summit people from our state wants are twice a year and see what is on your mind? i hope when i was under the secretary of there was more guidance. i think there needs to be. the second thing is that there needs to be a reorganization of the bbg.
of the palestinian leader's belongings. now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible concentration. the process will only take a few hours but samples will then be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yaszer arafat remains a powering figure for palestinians. but denight wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. >> translator: i don't support the process this man says because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> of course i'm against it, he says. it is insulting to martyr and to the palestinian people. >> reporter: the palestinian authority accused israel of being behind poisoning of arafat, a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if it can be traced on the remains eight years after the palestini
, it has 2 million views, 400,000 likes and 28,000 comments and passed from romania to russia to china. and the officer himself came forward. he is lawrence deprimo, an unfailingly polite 25-year-old who still lives with his mom and dad. >> so i went up to him and i was like, buddy, where's your socks, where's your shoes? he said, i never had a pair of socks or shoes, officer, but god bless you. i knew right then i needed to help him. >> reporter: when you presented him with the boots what was his reaction? >> he couldn't believe it. he was this is too much officer. god bless you, be safe, everything. like i said, almost like you gave him $1 million. >> reporter: officer deprimo doesn't know anything about the man he helped or what's become of him, but he keeps the receipt for the $75 he spent on the boots in his bulletproof vest, a reminder for all of us about the pervasiveness of need and potential for compassion. dan harris, abc new, new york. >> just a pure act of kindness. >> and he heard -- just before he got the boots, he heard someone chuckle at the homeless guy on the street.
after this election. russia is proposing a solution? >> yes, they are showing why it hasn't changed anything. the presidential statement is pretty and insignificant. a security council resolution is much more significant. what the russians are doing is clearly pushing something that they know the united states will have to veto. what they are trying to do is isolate and embarrass the united states at least so far, pushing where we will have to have a veto. if i were out there, i would enjoy doing it. i'm not sure the administration will enjoy it, but i suspect it will be till it in any event. jon: so the veto is the same as the statement and the u.s. would have to certainly almost veto it? >> yes, in a public way, not and that's what the russians are trying to do. they are trying to have this additional thing in new york. they are obviously having political reasons for the russians to do this. jon: stepping back and looking at the bigger picture, why is hamas going after and launching these rockets now. does it have something to do with iran and the nuclear capabilities? >> i suspec
as a stroke. now scientists from russia, switzerland and france will try to determine if loan yum poisoning was the cause. to loan yum emits deadly radiation that destroys human tissue, and though it cannot penetrate the stint if it's ingested, it does affect the organs. that is something israel denies. now, as for these tests, at the end of the day they might prove inconclusive. the poison decays very quickly, less than three years. arafat has been buried now for eight years. it is very possible, according to some investigators, that these results might tell us nothing at all. megyn? megyn: wow. david lee, thanks. >>> well, a homeowner shoots a pair of teenagers as they are breaking into his house, but now the prosecutors say he shot them, quote, in a manner that goes way beyond self-defense. trace gallagher walks us exactly through what happened. kelly's court debates, and you will decide who was in the right and who was in the wrong. >>> and president ronald reagan took office saying we needed to downsize government and dramatically cut federal spending, but in order or to make it happen
with the vatican's u.n. status and it would implicitly recognize palestinian statehood. france, russia, and spain plan to back the bid. britain, the u.s. and, of course, israel oppose it. no country has veto power in the general assembly so no one can actually block it. >>> now buenos aires, argentina, for the pole dance south america championship. this is called
and israel. supporting it are major nations such as france, russia, china, spain, denmark, portugal, ireland, britain and australia expected to abstain. it will certainly have widespread implications for the fragile middle east, bill. bill: where are the israelis on this rather? what is their response, eric? >> reporter: yeah the israelis say that status could only come from direct talks with no preconditions. those peace talks have stalled because of the continued building in the west bank and continued violence we've seen in the gaza. this does come on the 65th anniversary of the partition that created the two-state solutions, something palestinians and arabs rejected for three generations. >> direct negotiations is the dna of israeli-palestinian political process. any attempt to exert external pressure on israel would serve as a setback to those who are really interested in peace. if what you're interested in is public relations, then, this whole thing is just an exercise in futility. >> reporter: but hamas is now on board. they have rejected this until this weekend when they say they wil
have convinced russia to go against syria? do you think so? >> short answer is, i don't think. but i think it pays to ask the questions. this person is being put forward as secretary of state. what have you done in your post to warrant that? she was also, by the way, absent at the initial vote on the attempt the to break the israeli blockade that was launched out of turkey. when the u.n. convened an emergency session, again at the first session she was nowhere to be found. that's why i said there were other things that could be brought forward at a hearing like that. megyn: i want to talk to you, though, about whether this is secretary rice or ambassador rice's, you know, problem or whether this is a president obama problem. who sets the policy? and i also want to ask you about the other possible choice, which is john kerry. we'll do that after the break. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. ♪ megyn: and rejoining us now, michael mukasey, fo
, south america. whether it's china, russia, turkey. respect regional powers. >> so the arguments on the part of anybody, no international organization should listen to any arguments about going into syria or supporting the rebels in syria, in your judgment. >> in the syrian interest story -- first of all, we've got to get our intelligence correct. we don't know exactly what's happened in syria and i don't think we should fight a war on that. as to international organizations, it would be a good idea for us to join one. we are the only nation that has resisted the united nations . >> i only do this because we have a time clock here. great to see you. >> four parts. oliver stone always has an interesting take. >> unboring. >> yes, unboring. it's true. >>> instagram is kachanging the way that we see the world. we'll ask kevin systrom how his photo sharing site ended up [ libe ] le dnkrae ic oha lonn wer. eat moaue sghti ecic evs smeos n usac esi. th emesttso arow douan gw ouenelac w qteuris, lyews urxpur aayhath c dtoou 'sui aesn ard. dti romnd th iserome beusitel tstngen e am. r
! wow. i've he never seen anything other than in soviet russia to see this kind -- >> jim, jim -- >> what? david? >> is it too early to buy groupon? >> i've been debating that, and zynga. >> what is amazing, it wasn't that long ago, this company came public, marketed as a great growth stock. as melissa just said, there is no growth anywhere. it takes you back to a number of the ipos we know quite well, zynga, groupon, facebook to an extent, linkedin, this group never should have been public. before it went public they did that final round, raised $900 million and google was willing to pay them $6 billion for that company but they wouldn't pay it now. >> wow, wow. >> unbelievable. josh brown, frequent guest on "the halftime" today said they have destroyed 10 billion of a $12 billion original cap. this ipo was a war crime. >> a war crime? >> invokes nuremberg. >> have you mentioned, evercore going to $2 price target -- >> he starts by saying we missed our revenue expectations by meeting our operating profitability? wow. meeting what? meeting what? fiscal cliff. >> here on "squawk
? ahead of russia by 2020? >> yeah. one of the ironies is over the last couple of years, the oil industry, fossil fuel, the evil fossil fuel created so many jobs and so much wealth. look at pennsylvania alone, you got to worry about them coming under attack, particularly natural gas. you got a big hollywood movie coming out, anti-fracking and all that stuff. >> steve: the president later today will meet interestingly with union leaders and business leaders, tomorrow he'll meet with ceo's and congress and try to avert the fiscal cliff. what do you make of the meeting with the union guys? >> i got a huge beef with this. unions represent only 8% of sec. there is no way in the world they should be the first ones up. by the way, this is all look just like his jobs council. nothing but academics, union leaders and gigantic businesses. where is the small business? guys, let me tell you, businesses with less than 50 please created 13,000 jobs. where would the president and the country be without them? they never get a seat at the able. we crush them, we crush any hope for recovery. >> brian: we'l
with president karzai of afghanistan, prime min stir in italy, king ab dull la ii, and president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that, i'll take your questions. >> jay, thanks. a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering, one specific and them a bigger picture one. general al help, learning more about questions about him, and the pentagon investigation, alleged behavior. does the president have faith that general can continue to lead the war in afghanistan during this critical period of time while under investigation? >> i can tell you that the president thinks very highly of general allen and his service to the country as well as the job he's done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense, the president put on hold general allen's nomination as supreme allied commander of europe pending the investigation of general allen's conduct by the department of defense ig. the president remains focused on fully supporting our troops and partners in afghanistan that general allen led so ably for over a year. the president nominated general dunfo
them towards that will be huge. with issues in russia where radio free europe radio free europe basic or shut down its operations because they can't get the licensing because the government refuses to allow licenses to reading stations. we're going to see that. that to me, how we continue to use technology to push public diplomacy forward towards regimes that are going to use technology or intimidation to prevent that i think is going to really determine how the next four years ago. [inaudible] >> i would. it's a law that stops the state department from communicating with americans. it does present a lot of problems in an internet age. can i just add one thing? what p.j. said reminded me that i may have forgotten the most important legacy of all, and one of the things i meant to say here, which is i think that public diplomacy needs a big success. i think for public diplomacy to grow and become more important, we need to be able, the mecca people need to be able to point to something and say hey, that works. so for example, most americans believe that radio free europe helped bring do
and russia, it would only change if hamas met the long-standing conditions, which are recognizing israel and agreeing to end violence and accepting all the previously arranged agreements between the israelis and the palestinians. so if hamas were to accept those conditions, yes, i think the u.s. would go forth and end that boycott of hamas. it doesn't look like hamas is ready to accept those conditions, at least not yet. let's see what happens. it doesn't look like they're ready to do that any time soon. as a result, the u.s. will boycott hamas and won't have any direct talks with hamas and will still regard it as a state department listed terrorist organization. >> wolf blitzer reporting live from beer sheva, israel, this morning. >>> a man attacked a security guard at the u.s. embassy in tel aviv. the attacker was wielding an ax, but he also had a knife. the man now under arrest. >>> president obama getting updates on the middle east aboard air force one, in the air, on his way back home, wrapping up his tour of asia hours ago with stops in thailand, myanmar and cambodia, where he atte
union, russia, i met with tony blair yesterday here in jerusalem, and that peace process hadn't effect live gone anywhere since 2008. it's really been mired in a total collapse and a total mess. i'm not suggesting there's no hope it can be revived. it's going to take a lot of goodwill, maybe out of the crisis in gaza something positive can emerge, we shall see. there is no peace process for any practical purposes. george mitchell gave up 18 months or so ago when he dropped out of the obama administration, there hasn't been much. let's see what hillary clinton secretary of state can do when she meets with prime minister netanyahu and then meets with abbas and then talks with morsi. for all practical purposes for now that peace process is dormant. >> all right. wolf, thanks. we'll get back to you as soon as there's breaking news, obviously, if there's a deal or truce that comes out of it in the next couple of hour. israel says the talks are still going on. hamas is telling reuter they've reached an agreement with the israelis they'll end the fighting. you've got breaking news on the talk
abbas. >> the three conditions are put forward by the united states of america, russia, the independent united nations. they say stop shooting and start talking. we are not alone in that. if the world can agree that they can shoot and everything will be open and they won't be punished, it's a fantasy. i think even the egyptians understand deep in their hearts that this will not fly. and i'm presently surprised by the position taken by the president of egypt. >> mohamed morsi? >> yes. >> he's been doing a good job, in your view? >> i'm worried that his heart is somewhere else. but his behavior is responsible. and because responsibility is needed for everybody, for us and for them. you know, people say we are the problem. that's not the problem. hamas is losing peace. people say from the outside, newspapers, they say take out your settlements and lead your own life. nobody faults us. we have had 18 settlements. we took them out. there were close to 9,000 settl settlers. we left gaza free, open, gaza and israel. now we want to continue with the palestinians and people are saying, what are
, are at stake here. and that's why this is so difficult for us. >> and -- >> -- like russia. and interesting timing for all of this, right, between this and ehud barak's, interesting to watch. jamie rubin always nice to have you with us. coming up at the top of the hour we're going to talk more about what's happening in the middle east with dr. hanan ashrawi of the palestinian liberation organization. >>> still ahead on "starting point," you know all that confetti that was raining down on thanksgiving day parades. wasn't that fabulous? well, actually, it was very sensitive information. oops. social security numbers, things like that. >>> also, the man who played one of the most beloved characters in movie history, peter billingsley, ravel if i, ta ral, talks about the new musical. we're back in just a moment. ti . because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your pur
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